Join the Lost & Lonesome email list:


The Zebras "The Zebras" CD $18 (L&L017) Add To Basket.

* FREE SHIPPING! ***

The Zebras' bag is a driving, jangly one, complete with subtle boy/girl harmonies and catchy singsong melodies, recalling Teenage Fanclub at their most laid-back. The songs here on their self-titled debut album are dense in arrangement twists while the lyrics teeter between oblique and eyebrow-raising, with lead singer Jeremy Cole's bashful higher register at times bearing a passing resemblance to Michael Stipe or Wayne Coyne. Recorded in the band's formative hometown of Brisbane, the Go-Betweens' sound also serves as an obvious influence.


1) The Forces of Light (Preloading)
2) Look Confident
3) French Chicks
4) Three Minutes
5) Too Bad
6) Itchin' For a Fight
7) Biffin's Bridge
8) Old Men
9) Lucky Pierre



"That's the way to do it: Nine songs in 27 minutes and 15 seconds in the debut album from this Brisbane four-piece. There is no room for extended guitar noodling, just nine fizzing examples of popcraft that linger in the memory like a summers afternoon. Singer Jeremy Cole has a dreamy, whispery voice no matter how closely you listen, the lyrics only reveal themselves in snippets and the bands gossamer-light touch probably indicates that Pearl Jam didn't play a big part in their youth. The Monkees maybe, or the early Go-Betweens singles, although they fit just as easily with contemporary Australian practitioners such as The Lucksmiths and their Lost & Lonesome label-mates, Mid-State Orange. Sure, the sound is light and breezy but when tracks like Look Confident and Three Minutes get their hooks in, they don't let go. Next time they might even be confident enough to mix those vocals up just a little higher in the mix.?

Noel Mengel (three & half stars)" Courier Mail - Saturday July 17 2004



"Drawing on the more mellow, jangly side of Teenage Fanclub, The Zebras turn their delightful indie-pop into one of the strongest local debuts this year. The soft vocals of Jeremy Cole may recall Sandpit's Brendan Webb, but the music is all sunny, melodic guitar textures with nigh a dud tune within hearing distance.

four stars
" Rolling Stone July 2004